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The Training and Research Institute for Court Officials

Introduction

 The Training and Research Institute for Court Officials is a training institute established in affiliation with the Supreme Court. With the aim of bringing about proper and prompt justice and making court proceedings easy for the public to access and understand, this institute provides court officials other than judges with various training programs that enable them to acquire knowledge, skills and techniques that they need in performing their duties, and also to help them develop character and insight. It also conducts research on court procedures, thereby facilitating improvements in the performance of official duties in the courts.

 administration building

History

April 1950
 The Research and Training Institute for Court Clerks was established in affiliation with the Supreme Court (at Fujimicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo), providing training for court clerks, court secretaries and other court officials

May 1957
 The Research and Training Institute for Family Court Probation Officers was established in affiliation with the Supreme Court (at Fujimicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo), providing training for family court probation officers

April 1969
 The Research and Training Institute for Court Clerks was relocated to Hakusan, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo

December 1971
 The Research and Training Institute for Family Court Probation Officers was relocated to Nishigaoka, Kita-ku, Tokyo

April 2004
 The Research and Training Institute for Court Clerks and the Research and Training Institute for Family Court Probation Officers were integrated into the Training and Research Institute for Court Officials (Wako-shi, Saitama)

Organization

 The institute is composed of two divisions, the Research & Training Division and the Secretariat. The Research & Training Division is divided into three smaller divisions, each with dedicated professors. As indicated by their names, the Court Clerk Research & Training Division nurtures court clerks and conducts research and training relative to court clerks etc. Likewise, the Family Court Probation Officer Research & Training Division nurtures family court probation officers and conducts related research and training. The General Research & Training Divisions is responsible for research and training for court secretaries, etc. The Secretariat consists of five divisions, each providing support to ensure that all research and training activities proceed smoothly.

Organization

Facilities

 The Training and Research Institute for Court Officials has the five buildings shown below within its premises (about 40,000 m2).
1. Administration Building
2. Training Building
3. Public Welfare Building
4. Auditorium/Arena
5. Accommodation Building

Training

 Training provided by the Training and Research Institute for Court Officials is divided into two main categories: training courses for aspiring court clerks and family court probation officers, and other training courses.

(1) Training Courses
 A. Court clerk training course
  In order to enter the course for court clerks, the candidate must first complete a fixed term of employment as a court official and pass the entrance examination for the Training and Research Institute for Court Officials.
Court clerks are required to have the knowledge of laws and the skills to prepare and handle records and other documents, and have the ability to explain court proceedings to the parties concerned in a plain and easily understandable manner.
 In order to help them acquire those knowledge and skills, the institute provides trainees with a course of training in which they learn legal subjects including the Constitution, the Civil Code, the Penal Code, the Code of Civil Procedure, the Code of Criminal Procedure, Family Case Proceedings Act, and the Juvenile Act. Other subjects are also in place that enable trainees to acquire knowledge and skills in the wide range of works that they will handle as court clerks, such as examining and accepting complaints and other documents for court proceedings, preparing records and other trial documents, and managing the schedule of proceedings.
 B. Family court probation officer training course
  In order to enter the course for family court probation officers, the candidate must pass the employment examination (in human sciences) and subsequently receive appointment. Family court probation officers need to be equipped with expertise and skills in the field of human sciences, such as psychology, sociology, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of the relevant laws.
 In order to help them acquire those specialized knowledge and skills, the institute provides trainees with a course of training in which they learn legal subjects including the Constitution, the Civil Code, the Penal Code, the Family Case Proceedings Act, and the Juvenile Act, as well as relevant subjects of human sciences such as clinical psychology, developmental psychology, family sociology, criminal sociology, pedagogy, social welfare studies, and psychiatric medicine. Other subjects are also in place which enable trainees to acquire the expertise and techniques they need for serving as family court probation officers, such as investigation practice studies, case studies, psychological test technique exercises, and interview technique exercises.
 Trainees who have completed these courses are appointed as court clerks or family court probation officers.

(2) Other Training
 The institute offers the following training courses and workshops for officials in service, in order to improve their knowledge of, and abilities in the duties for which they are responsible.
 A. Training courses designed to enable officials to acquire the necessary knowledge and skills for performing their duties, commensurate with their length of experience and positions.
 B. Training courses for officials responsible for administrative affairs for court proceedings (civil/criminal/domestic relations/juvenile cases) or for the secretariat (general/financial affairs), to enable them to improve their ability to process work, and workshops to discuss how to improve administrative processing.

Research

 The institute conducts specialized research into the works handled by court officials and family court probation officers. The results of this research are compiled into reports and distributed to courts across the country, thereby helping to improve job performance.